Monday, December 29, 2008

THE WATERMARK.....

Recent postings of my work contain "the watermark" as my attempt to protect myself, the models, and everyone involved from the misuse of the work. At first I didn't want to do "the watermark" but over the years I have seen more and more of my work and my fellow photography friends work slattered on websites and other paraphanalia that misrepresents myself and the models. As the use and misuse of the internet becomes more popular, I felt some effort of protection on my part is necessary.

I came up with a watermark that looks more like magazine credits to not take away from the work as art.


Today I saw a series of images I shot of a particular model who opt'd against using "the watermark" images on his facebook, myspace, modelmayhem and other internet pages. As I was resizing a set of images and adding the watermark I explained to him the importance of using "the watermark" versions. He totally disregarded my request and use larger non-watermark versions ...telling me that he was about the art and felt it was more artistic without "the watermark". He felt like my watermarking the images made them look like advertising and he want the shots to look like art. As my mom would say " he must think my name sammy sausage-head." i gave him the non-watermark versions so he could print them. His art belongs on his walls not on myspace and facebook. Who goes to myspace and facebook to look at art?
True enough if someone wants to steal the images bad enough they can remove the watermark off the images but if someone wants to steal your car or break into your house bad enough, they can pick the lock. What's the point of locking your door? Its always good to take some measure of precaution.
video
Allura Pulliam - one of the original girls I worked with in Memphis...

One of the models I shot told me he wished I had done "the watermarks" sooner because he saw images of himself plastered on gay event flyers during his last trip to Atlanta. I know I have seen images of other models on club flyers on the street here in New York.

This situation with this model and the experience has made me implement a series of new practices when working with people in reference posting images I have shot on the internet. Understand that I do see my work as art and value it as such but I definitely don't like being out and about and see my photographs on club flyers or surfing thru other people's blogs and websites and see my work in a misrepresentative manner.

Despite this one model's blatant disregard and lack of respect, I hope that the rest of the models I have worked with and work with in the future respect and adhere to posting "the watermark" versions on the internet....

Because this model has put myself and my work in a vulnerable state, I will never work with him again. He gets the middle finger from me.

4 comments:

  1. download the release off my main page, i think it says something about putting non-water marked images on the web. take the extra time and have everyone sign one, no matter how insignificant the shoot might be, that way, next time someone want's to disregard your instructions, you can sue :)

    ~SE

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  2. tarrice, i agree with sidney.

    but also you should get credit for your work. i keep a blog of photography of black man found in the web and now that i am familiar with your work--you have a very clear individual style--i've realized that i have a few of your photographs posted. now, is my intention not to give you credit for them? no. but because they have no watermark it is hard to pinpoint their origin.

    i say: make 'em use a the watermark for online activities because pics get saved and reposted a trillion times. besides, how will the world know who the photographer is?

    ps. please look through my archives and let me know which are yours so i can give you credit. or give me a watermark version to put up.

    much love,
    joseph

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  3. Tarrice, while I think you do good work, I just couldnt help but notice the lack of African American women on your site. In your experience do you feel as though African American woman get better or more exposure in the modeling industry than African American men? Are you more concerned about helping men get positive exposure because of the negative stereotypes African American men are fraught with in the media? If so, I commend you for your work, but would like to see more sisters get exposure to, the type that dignify us instead of bring us down too. Anyhow just a curious on looker, hope you dont mind the questions.

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  4. IN NY ITS MUCH MORE DIFFICULT TO WORK WITH WOMEN B/C I DON'T HAVE THE ACCESS TO MUAS, STYLING, AND HAIR STYLIST TO CREATE IMAGES THAT COMPETE IN THE INDUSTRY. WHEN I DO POST STRONG, BEAUTIFUL FEMALES IMAGES, I DON'T GET THE SAME SUPPORT OR RESPONSE I GET WITH THE FELLAS.
    I WOULD LIKE TO SEE MORE AFRICAN AMERICANS (MALE AND FEMALE) BE MORE VOCAL AND PROACTIVE ABOUT SEEING THEMSELVES PORTRAYED WITH DIGNITY. THEY ALSO NEED TO BE MORE SUPPORTIVE AND ENCOURAGING WHEN THEY SEE THESE IMAGES.
    SUPPLY AND DEMAND....THE AMERICAN FASHION INDUSTRY IS ABOUT MONEY... YOU DEMAND IT THEY WILL $UPPLY IT.

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